Workshops

Tuesday, January 30 & Wednesday, January 31

Learn a new skill: take a pre-conference workshop! Pre-conference workshops include a range of training opportunities for different audiences, including professional and amateur botanists, backyard gardeners, biologists/ecologists, conservationists, landscaping professionals, nursery managers, CNPS members, and native plant lovers of all kinds.

All workshops will be held onsite at the LAX Marriott; registration discounts are provided for those who are also attending the conference. Pre-registration is required no later than January 14, 2018 – workshops have limited capacity and may fill up earlier, register now to secure your spot!

Did you know CNPS also offers field-based training workshops throughout the year? Check out CNPS’s statewide workshops happening now »


ABCs of Mitigation Monitoring
Wednesday, January 31, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: David L. Magney, Certified Consulting Botanist, ISA Certified Arborist, Manager, CNPS Rare Plant Program
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

CEQA requires that all significant impacts to botanical resources either be avoided or minimized and mitigated to a point that the residual impact is less than significant. To ensure compliance with required mitigation measures, monitoring is often required to measure and document how that mitigation is progressing. Since many mitigation measures, such as translocating a rare plant population, usually fail, regular monitoring is now usually required so that there are not big surprises at the end of the monitoring period, when the mitigation measure is supposed to have been successful. This workshop will provide an overview and description of the basics of monitoring mitigation measures intended to protect or restore botanical resources of a project site.

This workshop is designed for advanced beginner, intermediate, and advanced practitioners. Knowledge/experience writing mitigation measures is helpful. Participants should have at least 3 years’ experience as an environmental consultant.

David L. Magney has over 30 years of experience in biological studies and environmental consulting. He has managed projects focusing on large-scale habitat classification and mapping, wetlands inventory and restoration planning, and water reuse and diversion that affect wetland habitats containing numerous special-status plant and wildlife species. Mr. Magney has prepared and managed biological resources sections of EIRs and Initial Studies pursuant to the CEQA for numerous projects, and has critically reviewed numerous CEQA documents since 1982. He has operated David Magney Environmental Consulting since 1997, prior to which he has worked for Fugro West, Inc., Jones & Stokes Associates, Dames & Moore, NOREAS, BioResource Consultants, USFS (Los Padres National Forest), and UC Santa Barbara Herbarium.

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Assessing Wetland Functional Models: HGM and CRAM
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructors: David L. Magney, Certified Consulting Botanist, ISA Certified Arborist, Manager, CNPS Rare Plant Program, President, David Magney Environmental Consulting; Michelle L. Stevens, PhD, CRAM Instructor, Assistant Professor, California State University, Sacramento
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

Use of models that provide objective assessments of the condition of wetland functions can be extremely helpful to consultants and decision-makers who guide and permit projects that affect wetlands directly and/or indirectly. Two different but similar assessment models have been developed: the Hydrogeomorphic Assessment Method (HGM) and the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM). Both models have three basic components: physical, chemical, and biotic. How they are characterized, assessed, and compared varies. Each method has wetland classes/subclasses; both can provide objective rankings of wetland functions for both baseline and post-project conditions and can be important planning tools. This workshop will provide an overview and explanation of HGM and CRAM, their similarities and differences, training needed to use them, and their applicability and usefulness to environmental consultants and others.

This workshop is designed for advanced beginner, intermediate, and advanced practitioners. Prior knowledge of/experience in wetland assessment and delineation is helpful. Participants should have at least 3 years’ experience as a biological consultant.

David L. Magney has over 30 years of experience in biological studies and environmental consulting. He has managed projects focusing on large-scale habitat classification and mapping; wetlands inventory, assessment, and restoration planning; and water reuse and diversion that affect wetland habitats containing numerous special-status plant and wildlife species. Mr. Magney has prepared and managed biological resources sections of EIRs and Initial Studies pursuant to the CEQA for numerous projects. He has been trained in the use of HGM, reviewed HGM regional models, and developed a draft regional guidebook for desert playa wetlands. He has previously worked for Fugro West, Inc., Jones & Stokes Associates, Dames & Moore, NOREAS, BRC, USFS Los Padres National Forest, and UC Santa Barbara Herbarium.

Michelle L. Stevens has over 20 years of experience in riparian/ wetland research, including expertise in California environmental regulations (Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, NEPA, and CEQA), environmental policy, watershed planning and community groups, public outreach/education, and restoration planning and implementation.  She has participated in California Wetland Monitoring Workgroups sponsored by the CA State Water Board including wetland inventory development, implementation, and use of data to improve wetland management in California, and is Certified in Level 2 CRAM for riparian systems and meadows working groups.

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Best Management Practices for California Nurseries Growing Native Plants
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructor: Mike Evans, Founder/President, Tree of Life Nursery
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

High standards of quality in nursery grown plants are achieved worldwide with numerous products including food crops, fruit/nut trees and vines, ornamental plants, and regional natives used for reforestation and ecological restoration. This workshop will review several standard universal practices for plant health. In addition, we will discuss issues specific to California native plant nurseries. Topics covered will include: developing and implementing written Best Management Practices (BMPs) for growing and shipping California native plant nursery stock; identifying Critical Control Points, both general in nature and specific to individual nursery situations; using sanitation and good hygiene to prevent and control product damage caused by injurious plant pests, weeds and disease; how nurseries can partner with CNPS in promoting healthy nursery grown native plants for use in home gardens, commercial landscapes and restoration projects.

This workshop is designed for nursery and restoration professionals, CNPS plant sale coordinators, and resource/land managers, with a basic understanding of the principles of nursery production, native plant horticulture, and ecological restoration.

Participants will receive sample BMPs and several resources available through Tree of Life Nursery, authored by the instructor, including, “Creating and Caring for Your Native Garden,” and “Watering Native Plants.”

Mike Evans, along with Jeff Bohn and a team of 30 professionals, operate the 40-acre Tree of Life Nursery in San Juan Capistrano. Over their 40-year history, they have received numerous awards in the field of native plant horticulture. Mike is Past President of the California Society for Ecological Restoration and the International Plant Propagators Society.

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Black & White Drawing Techniques in Botanical Illustration
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Olga Ryabtsova, Botanical Artist; Exhibition Chair of the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California
Registration: $95 Attending the Conference / $125 Not Attending the Conference

This workshop will focus on black and white drawing techniques. We will review the materials required, and participants will learn about the perception of light, shadow, and contrast in drawing with a graphite pencil, metalpoint, pen and ink. Drawing with all mentioned materials will be demonstrated. Participants will draw a sketch from a living plant or fruit or a provided photo with graphite, and start an original work with metalpoint.

This workshop is open to anyone interested in botanical art and drawing techniques. All skill levels are welcome (beginner, intermediate, advanced artists who are interested in metalpoint).

Preliminary list of supplies that participants will need to bring (more details will be provided before the workshop):

  • Graphite pencils 2H, HB, 2B, 4B
  • Sharpener
  • Sketch paper
  • Tracing paper
  • Drawing paper
  • Eraser
  • Board to support paper and tape to hold it
  • Metalpoint wire and holder
  • Portable light lamp (optional)

Olga Ryabtsova received a degree in graphic design, illustration, and oil painting from Moscow State University of Printing Arts in Moscow, Russia. She has worked as an art director for advertising agencies, and later as an illustrator and photographer for fashion magazines in Russia. After Olga moved to California, her interests shifted to botanical art and techniques. Olga is the Exhibit Chair of the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California. She conducts drawing workshops for adults and children. Olga’s works are displayed in juried and non-juried exhibitions in Russia, Europe and United States. Her media include graphite, ink, silverpoint, watercolor, oil, etching, and digital drawing.

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Botany Kick-start
Tuesday, January 30, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Bob Allen, Adjunct Professor of Biology, Santiago Canyon College & Orange Coast College; Research Associate in Entomology, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Research Associate, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
Registration: $115 Attending the Conference / $145 Not Attending the Conference

In the morning, we’ll cover plant basics and plant anatomy from leaves to flowers to fruit. In the afternoon, it’s on to plant families with lots of cool flower dissections. This knowledge will reduce the amount of time required to key most plants to genus and species. Emphasis will be given to California plant families; however, information learned in this class will be readily applicable throughout California and the world.

This workshop will be taught at a beginner level and is open to anyone interested in learning or improving their knowledge of plant terminology and the basic characteristics of common California plant families.

A handout with an outline of the information and illustrations used in the class will be provided.

Bob Allen is an entomologist, botanist, instructor, nature photographer, and author. In addition to college courses, he teaches workshops and short courses about nature photography, entomology, botany, and pollination in classroom and field. His latest book is Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains, occnps.org/wildflower-book.html

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Calflora Tools for Mapping and Conservation
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Instructors: Cynthia Powell, Executive Director, Calflora; John Malpas, Technical Lead, Calflora
Registration: $95 Attending the Conference / $125 Not Attending the Conference

This course will be a combination of lecture and field exercises on importing, exporting, and using Calflora data. We will discuss applications of collecting data in the field using Calflora apps for Android and iOS devices, creating history stacks to track changes over time, and mapping. We’ll cover how iNaturalist and Consortium of California Herbaria (CCH) data feed into Calflora, and how Calflora records feed into the California Natural Diversity Database (CNDDB). Participants will learn applications of Calflora in the field and at work, how Calflora data are used for rare plant and mapping projects, how to collect rare and non-rare plant data using Calflora tools, how to document data using customized forms and offline map caches, and how vegetation types and attributes can be mapped.

This workshop is designed for professional and student botanists, ecologists, land and resource managers, restoration volunteers, and conservationists. Participants should have an initial understanding of Calflora and basic plant identification and/or GIS skills.

Cynthia Powell became Calflora’s Executive Director one year ago after 3 years as Calflora’s GIS Project Manager. She graduated with her MS in GIS in 2010 forecasting Mokelumne River water supply based on MODIS remote sensing snow pack images. She’s been examining what was under that snow – plants – ever since. She now coordinates all Calflora programs, research, outreach, and advocacy, as well as fundraising and management.

John Malpas lives in Sebastopol with his family and 14 chickens, one chicken for each year he’s been at Calflora. Formerly at AT&T Bell Labs and Nomura Securities, he has two decades of experience wrangling web sites in many software technologies, his favorite being Java. In spare time he is a native plant gardener.

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CEQA 101
Tuesday, January 30, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructors: Greg Suba, Conservation Program Director, CNPS; David Magney, Rare Plant Program Manager, CNPS
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

This workshop will provide a basic understanding of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and how it works in relation to biological resources, with special emphasis on plant species and communities. Regulations and basic science approaches will be emphasized. Participants will learn to review and identify the parts of a CEQA document that are critical to plant conservation at the project level, and will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how to review and comment on/critique CEQA documents in a meaningful manner with the intent of improving the quality of the CEQA project.

This workshop is open to grassroots conservation advocates, CNPS members, consultants, environmentalists, and members of the general public with an interest in learning how to effectively leverage California’s environmental law to engage in plant conservation. Biologists/botanists who conduct biological assessments and write EIR sections, and members of the public who want to be able to adequately understand and review the biological impact assessments prepared to satisfy CEQA, will benefit from this class. No prior experience or knowledge is required.

Handouts summarizing information provided during the workshop will be provided.

Greg Suba coordinates the development and implementation of native plant conservation policies and initiatives for CNPS. He has been CNPS’s Conservation Program Director since 2009.

David Magney manages the staff and many ongoing projects of the CNPS Rare Plant Program. He has worked as a consultant since 1986, formed his own consulting firm in 1997, and has taught classes and workshops on a variety of subjects, including CEQA. David has been an active member of CNPS since he first joined back in the 1970’s.

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Emerging Insect Pests of Native Trees
Wednesday, January 31, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructors: Sabrina Drill, Natural Resources Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension; Andrea Hefty, Forest Entomologist, USDA Forest Service; Stacy Hishinuma, Forest Entomologist, USDA Forest Service
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

New invasive insects pose a devastating threat to California’s riparian and oak woodlands. For example, Kuroshio shot hole borer contributed to the near complete collapse of the willow community along the Tijuana River, while goldspotted oak borer is implicated in the death of over 80,000 oaks in San Diego. These pests are poised to spread rapidly around the state. This workshop will introduce the biology of invasive insect pests and disease vectors, including polyphagous and Kuroshio shot hole borers, goldspotted oak borer, and walnut twig beetle. We will cover basic ecology and the potential for range expansion, then give detailed training in how to: recognize the insects and signs of damage in wildland trees; design a monitoring program; and methods to prevent and manage infestations.

This workshop is designed for land managers and biologists working in/managing/restoring native forests and woodlands. No prior pest or entomology experience necessary.

Participants will receive paper handouts, our P/KSHB laminated field guide grommet mounted card set, and a GSOB laminated wallet ID card.

This workshop may qualify for CEU’s from ISA (International Society for Arboriculture); SAF (Society of American Foresters), and DPR (CA Department of Pesticide Regulation for QAC/QAL holders).

Sabrina Drill is the Natural Resources Advisor for UC Cooperative Extension. Her areas of research include restoration of urban streams, aquatic invasive species, and citizen science. For the past 3 years, she has coordinated outreach and education about invasive shot hole borers including http://www.pshb.org, and she is currently coordinating volunteer monitoring for this pest. Sabrina holds a Ph.D. in Geography from UCLA.

Andrea Hefty is a Forest Entomologist for the USDA Forest Service, focusing on southern California National Forest, tribal land, and state and city partner agencies. She completed a doctorate in entomology from the University of Minnesota in June 2016. Before starting her graduate degree, she was a Conservation Corps volunteer (2009-2011) and Peace Corps volunteer (Togo 2006-2008).

Stacy Hishinuma is a Forest Entomologist for the USDA Forest Service in southern California, where she provides technical expertise to the National Forests, Native American tribes, and other federal partners. She completed her Ph.D. in entomology from the University of California, Davis where she studied the walnut twig beetle and thousand cankers disease of walnuts.

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Field Data Collection Using the ESRI Collector App for Mobile
Tuesday, January 30, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructor: Jaime Ratchford, Associate Vegetation Ecologist, California Native Plant Society
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

There are several options available for collecting data in the field. In this workshop we will demonstrate how to use mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to collect data in the field with a focus on Esri’s Collector App for ArcGIS. Collector is a free app available for Android or iOS that is used in conjunction with ArcGIS Online. Using the app, you can collect points, lines, and polygons as well as enter attribute data all while using your mobile device in the field and without an internet connection. Data can be collected offline and stored on the device to be synced with ArcGIS Online at a later time. We will demonstrate the process for building geodatabases and maps in ArcGIS for publishing online, how to build web maps for use in Collector, and how to access those maps in Collector and add and edit data in the field. There will be an opportunity to gain hands-on experience using the app on your own device.

This workshop is open to anyone who needs to collect georeferenced data in the field, including biologists, consultants, citizen scientists, etc. Some familiarity with GIS and ArcMap is recommended. Participants must have access to an ArcGIS Online account to use Collector, and are encouraged to bring an Android or iOS mobile device with the Collector app installed to the class.

Attendees will be provided with a handout outlining the steps and procedures for using Collector.

Attendees are welcome to bring laptops equipped with Wi-Fi and/or ArcMap. A mobile device with the Collector app installed is encouraged.

Jaime Ratchford is an Associate Vegetation Ecologist with the Vegetation Program at CNPS. She earned a Master’s degree from Humboldt State University in Biology and has worked for CNPS for over four years assisting in vegetation assessment projects throughout California. She assists with the collection, management, and classification of vegetation data.

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Grass ID: You Can Totally Do This! An Introduction to Grass Identification
Wednesday, January 31, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructors: Andrea Williams, Vegetation Ecologist, Marin Municipal Water District; Michele Hammond, Botanist, East Bay Regional Park District; Rachel Kesel, Conservation Management Specialist, One Tam
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

The goal of this workshop is to give attendees confidence and skills to key an unfamiliar grass, and recognize key characteristics and groupings. First, a brief introduction the ecological history of California grasslands will be offered, followed by a summary of the current status of this valuable resource with respect to weed invasion, restoration, and land use. Workshop leaders will go over important grass anatomy and associated vocabulary before introducing the grass key found in the 2nd Edition of The Jepson Manual (Eds. Baldwin et al.), as well as online resources for assistance in keying. Participants will spend some time with fresh and dried specimens, examining characters and understanding groupings of grasses to form a basis on which to build further knowledge.

This workshop is designed for botanists, resource and range professionals, ecologists, as well as interested landscape professionals and home gardeners. Participants should have a basic understanding of dichotomous keys and plant anatomy.

Participants will receive key excerpts and supplies to create reference specimens.

Andrea Williams is a Vegetation Ecologist for Marin Municipal Water District on Mt. Tamalpais as well as a board member of the California Native Grasslands Association. She has worked in coastal grasslands from Northern California to Oregon off and on for 25 years.

Michele Hammond is a Botanist for the East Bay Regional Park District in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, and is also a board member of the California Native Grasslands Association. She has studied California grasslands and their ecology and management for the past 20 years.

Rachel Kesel is a Conservation Management Specialist for One Tam. She holds a Master of Science in Conservation from University College London, where she honed her research and field skills. She loves grasses and grasslands, but then who doesn’t?

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Habitat Gardening: Pollinators, Beneficials, and the Soil Foodweb
Tuesday, January 30, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Frédérique Lavoipierre, Education Program Manager, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden
Registration: $95 Attending the Conference / $125 Not Attending the Conference

This workshop will begin with an introduction to garden allies, and the principles of conservation biological control. We will explore the soil foodweb, and learn about native bees’ role in pollination. Then the basic orders of insects will be introduced, and the life stages of some important species of predatory insects. Common species of beneficial insects, both predators and pollinators, are included. In the afternoon, we will focus on native plants and how to design habitat for garden allies. Participants will learn how to apply what they learn in diverse landscape situations.

Any interested person can participate in this workshop with no prior experience, however, it is structured so that participants with even substantial background in entomology, IPM, and habitat planting will find the workshop useful and highly informative.

Resources provided will include handouts drawn from the presenter’s Pacific Horticulture Magazine column, “Garden Allies,” including up-to-date information on insect hotels and hedgerows, lists of suggested plants for various applications, and a list of websites, books, and other resources that will allow participants to explore the topic in greater depth.

Frédérique Lavoipierre holds an MS in Biology; her research emphasis was on plant resources for beneficial insects. She has included native plants to enhance biological control in garden, nursery, and small farm settings since 1980. Frédérique is the Education Program Manager at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden.

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Introduction to Botanical Art Techniques
Tuesday, January 30, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Gilly Shaeffer, Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California & American Society of Botanical Artists
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

Botanical art starts with a good drawing. Through demonstrations and hands-on practice, participants will learn ways to create line drawings of plants. We will focus on the need for close observation when creating botanical art. Class will begin with an overview of the materials used to create botanical art and how they are used, including pencils, drawing paper, erasers, magnifiers, watercolor brushes, paints, and watercolor paper. Next participants will be introduced to shading from light to dark to create three dimensional forms. Exercises will further participants’ understanding of form through creation of their own three dimensional forms. An introduction to the importance of a light source in drawing plant forms will be included. Class will conclude with time to sketch from natural forms so that class participants can apply the concepts presented during the class to their actual plant drawings.

This workshop is designed for people who have an interest in learning more about how to draw and eventually paint plants, and will be taught at a beginner level.

Participants will receive a list of reference books for the beginning study of drawing. Handouts will be provided covering basic points made in the class which will include exercises that can be done at home. A variety of books that are highly recommended in the study of botanical illustration and watercolor will be available to look at during class, as well as recent exhibition catalogues.

Please plan to bring Strathmore drawing paper pad 400 Series, graphite drawing pencils 2H, HB, and 2B, and a Cretacolor brand kneaded eraser (more details will be provided to registered participants – the cost for these materials should be around $15 for those who do not yet own them).

Gilly Shaeffer’s lifelong interest in art and love of nature drew her to the study of botanical art. Her work has been selected to appear in juried exhibitions at museums, galleries, and gardens throughout the United States. She has taught Botanical Illustration and Watercolor at Virginia Robinson Gardens and Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. She also teaches Botanical Art Techniques at her home studio on Mount Washington in Los Angeles.

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Legislative Action: Understanding the Process for Making Law
Tuesday, January 30, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Vern Goehring, Legislative Advisor, Natural Solutions for Advocacy
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

Elected officials are bombarded from all sides and from powerful interests. Getting their attention can be difficult, and one can conclude that only big money interests get heard. But there are many examples of well-organized grassroots campaigns winning the day with compelling arguments and successful strategies. In this workshop, participants will learn the process for making state and local laws – how legislation and ordinances are introduced, lobbied, opposed, and challenged, and how grassroots activism can effectively apply pressure and increase your chances of success with the State Legislature or any elected body.

This workshop is open to anyone interested in advocating for legislative change, including grassroots conservation advocates, CNPS members, and the general public. No prior experience or knowledge is required.

Participants will receive handouts summarizing the information presented during the workshop.

Vern Goehring has many years of experience in government management, legislative and regulatory advocacy, and policy making. He worked for the State of California for 26 years in various administrative and management positions, including as a legislative advocate for the Departments of Transportation and Fish & Game. He started a private consulting practice in 1997 and assists clients with legislative and administrative advocacy, policy and strategy development, and organizational management. He is a registered lobbyist in California.

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Macro Photography and the Meet Your Neighbors International Project
Tuesday, January 30, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructor: Lech Naumovich, Conservation Photographer
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

This workshop demonstrates the photography technique in the www.meetyourneighbours.net project. This international project serves to produce a publicly accessible set of images cataloging the living earth. In addition, we will discuss some basics of macro photography (and photography in general), including metering modes, exposure compensation, depth of focus, manual camera modes, image file types, image stacking, post processing and more. Participants will learn a stylized macro technique and generally learn about how a camera functions so they can take the pictures they want more quickly and with more confidence.

Photographers and photography enthusiasts. Participants should be familiar with basic camera function and photography and have access to a camera with manual modes that can accommodate flash photography.

We highly recommend participants bring a camera with manual modes that can accommodate flash photography. We will have a couple of extra cameras available for the training.

Handouts and supplemental digital materials will be provided.

Lech Naumovich has worked as a California-based restoration ecologist and a photographer for almost 15 years. He specializes in the unique connection between humans and conservation. His photography clients and partners have included National Geographic, Huntington Post, National Parks, Bay Nature magazine, and a host of local conservation groups and consultants. He is a photographer for the Meet Your Neighbors project.

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Rare Plant Treasure Hunt: An Introduction and How-to
Tuesday, January 30, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Catherine Curley, Assistant Botanist & Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Coordinator, California Native Plant Society
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

What is a Rare Plant Treasure Hunt (RPTH) and how does it aid in the conservation of rare native plants in California? In this workshop, participants will learn about the RPTH project, as well as how to conduct hunts on their own, for those that are interested in the possibility of doing so. There will be an overview of the structure and intent of the project, a look at other citizen science variations in rare plant conservation and how they relate to the RPTH, and an introduction in the how to of treasure hunting. This latter section will include utilizing Esri’s Collector app, for those that are taking part in the “Field Data Collection Using the ESRI Collector App for Mobile” workshop on the morning of this workshop (the Collector workshop is not a prerequisite for conducting an RPTH).

This workshop is designed for anyone interested in learning more about the Rare Plant Treasure Hunt (RPTH) project, as well as those interested in learning how to conduct or lead RPTHs on their own.

An optional Rare Plant Treasure Hunt will take place nearby (location TBA) following the conference on Sunday, February 4 – join us and test your new skills!

Catherine Curley works for the Rare Plant Program of the California Native Plant Society researching rare plants and rare plant communities around the state as well as coordinating the Rare Plant Treasure Hunt project. Recently, Catherine has also been providing support for CNPS’s Important Plant Areas (IPA) initiative.

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Seed Collection and Production for Restoration
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructors: Jutta C. Burger, PhD, Managing Director, Science and Stewardship, Irvine Ranch Conservancy; Matt Garrambone, Plant Materials Coordinator, Irvine Ranch Conservancy; Rachel Lambert, Seed Farm Stewardship Coordinator, Irvine Ranch Conservancy
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

During this workshop, Irvine Ranch Conservancy staff will share their experiences managing a plant material development program that provides site appropriate plant material for landscape scale ecological restoration projects in Southern California. This half day workshop will cover a host of topics associated with plant and seed development, including: plant palette design, seed collection protocols, seed production, nursery growing, seed processing, seed storage, seed test data, seed characteristics, and inventory management. IRC staff will share successful strategies, as well as lessons learned, that should help practitioners match collection and production with restoration demands, whether they are doing the work internally or contracting it out. In addition, they will offer tips for engaging the public in these activities, information that should be of special interest to anyone working with volunteers.

Participants will receive a series of handouts, including: a flow chart of the development process (with important details that demand consideration), a cheat sheet for using seed test data, and a list of resources that can be used to find additional information.

Instructor bios coming soon!

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The Case for Native Plant Landscaping: Influencing Decision-Makers
Wednesday, January 31, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Susan Krzywicki, Owner, Krzywicki Consulting
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

Policy makers have been focusing on one aspect of sustainability: water use. Of course, California native plants can succeed at meeting WELO (Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance) guidelines. Native plants, though, are the only solution that brings rich Added-Value, beyond their usually great low ratings in WUCOLS (Water Use Classifications of Landscape Species) listings. They provide additional benefits: connection to our unique heritage, habitat for stressed bee and butterfly populations, plants that can better withstand our local conditions, and the ability to create urban connectors to wildlands in a mosaic approach. In this workshop, we will review WUCOLS case studies for specific plants, show how their benefits exceed generic “drought tolerant” solutions and provide context for creating a vibrant message about the use of native plants in the new normal of landscape design and maintenance.

This workshop is designed for municipal and state policy makers involved in construction, landscaping decision making and policy, and/or stormwater and water conservation; water authority professionals; irrigation industry professionals; landscape professionals; home gardeners; chapter volunteers who are involved in public outreach on the drought message; environmental activists; urban foragers and gardeners; and people interested in preserving and encouraging wildlife habitat. Basic gardening knowledge recommended.

Susan Krzywicki is a native plant landscape designer in San Diego. She was the former Horticulture Program Director for CNPS, as well as chair of the San Diego Surfrider Foundation Ocean Friendly Gardens Committee and is on the board of San Diego Canyonlands.

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The Natural Landscape: Creating Beautiful Gardens at Home and in the Community
Tuesday, January 30, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Instructors: Mike Evans, President, Tree of Life Nursery; Jodie Cook, Owner, Jodie Cook Garden Design; Kristen Wernick, Outreach Coordinator, California Native Plant Society
Registration: $95 Attending the Conference / $125 Not Attending the Conference

This workshop will give each participant the skills and the knowledge to introduce, promote, and build natural gardens in the front yards (and back yards) of homes anywhere in California. Concentrating on total replacement of turf and other inappropriate thirsty ornamental landscapes with native plants, we will focus on the watershed approach (how to make both rain and irrigation more effective), and ecological design. The same concepts can be employed in larger sites such as schools, water district offices, government buildings, and passive parks. Topics to be covered include how to promote these transformed gardens and how to design and build them; turf removal, contour grading, irrigation (if any), hardscape, paths, amenities, plants, early establishment and mid-long term care. We will also discuss opportunities for interpretive materials and education in these natural gardens.

Homeowners, gardeners, city and water district personnel, landscapers, architects, and planners are welcome to attend. This workshop is open to all skill levels.

Participants will receive practical handouts, worksheets, plant lists, sample plans and graphics, sample interpretive materials, and Tree of Life Nursery’s publication, “Creating and Caring for Your Native Garden.”

Mike Evans is founder and president of Tree of Life Nursery (californianativeplants.com), the largest native plant nursery in the state. For 40 years, the nursery has continued a message begun by the early horticultural heroes of California: that our state’s incredible beauty can be brought into our homes, towns, cities, parks, and open spaces with natural gardens.

Jodie Cook is an accomplished horticulturist with a unique focus on the watershed approach to natural gardening. As a designer, she uses native plants to tell stories. Through her company myavantgarden.com, homeowners transform their front yard lawns into beautiful native plant gardens, vibrantly attracting birds, butterflies, beneficial pollinators, and other wildlife species.

Kristen Wernick is a California native plant and horticulture enthusiast with a passion for teaching and engaging others in native plant gardening. She is a graduate of UCSB in Environmental Studies and has an A.S. in Landscape Design from Saddleback College. Kristen is currently supporting CNPS’s native plant gardening outreach efforts, working with California nurseries, private homeowners, schools, government agencies, and CNPS staff and volunteers to build a movement to restore nature one garden at a time using California native plants.

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The Pressed Plant: Making High Quality Herbarium Specimens
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Instructor: Mare Nazaire, Herbarium Collections Manager, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

This half-day, hands-on workshop will familiarize participants with the techniques of plant collecting and making herbarium specimens. The first half of the workshop will focus on how plant specimens are collected, pressed and dried, and what information is included on specimen labels. In the second half, participants will learn techniques for mounting dried plant specimens onto paper and will have an opportunity to put learned techniques into practice by mounting herbarium specimens provided by the instructor.

This workshop is designed for those who are interested in natural history collections and want to learn how to make high quality herbarium specimens. No prior experience necessary.

Participants will receive handouts on guidelines for techniques in making quality herbarium specimens, and further sources related to natural history collections.

Mare Nazaire is a botanist and herbarium collections manager with Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and treasurer for the Society of Herbarium Curators. She received her Ph.D. in botany from Washington State University in 2013. She has worked as a botanist in New England, the Southwestern U.S., and the Pacific Northwest. Her current research focuses on the systematics and biogeography of Mertensia (Boraginaceae), and aquatic vascular plants.

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Using Calscape for Native Garden Planning
Wednesday, January 31, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructors: Kristen Wernick, Outreach Coordinator, CNPS; Dennis Mudd, creator of Calscape.org
Registration: $50 Attending the Conference / $70 Not Attending the Conference

California’s vast native plant palette gives home gardeners and landscapers a rich array of landscaping options. But California’s diverse geography and climate zones can also make it hard to select and find the right plants. Calscape.org solves these challenges with powerful, new features that help you create the California native garden of your dreams. Whether you’re a home gardener, landscape designer, or contractor, this workshop will show you how to get the most out of Calscape’s features, from advanced search functionality to plant lists and sample garden plans. This course makes a great complement to “The Natural Landscape: Creating Beautiful Gardens at Home and in the Community” offered on Tuesday.

This workshop is open to anyone interested in learning how to use Calscape to design a native plant garden, including home gardeners, landscape designers, and more. No prior experience is necessary.

Kristen Wernick is a California native plant and horticulture enthusiast with a passion for teaching and engaging others in native plant gardening. She is a graduate of UCSB in Environmental Studies and has an A.S. in Landscape Design from Saddleback College. Kristen is currently supporting CNPS’s native plant gardening outreach efforts, working with California nurseries, private homeowners, schools, government agencies, and CNPS staff and volunteers to build a movement to restore nature one garden at a time using California native plants.

Dennis Mudd – coming soon!

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Using GIS to Create Habitat Suitability Maps for Restoration and Reintroduction of At-risk Plant Species
Tuesday, January 30, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Instructor: Erin Questad, Assistant Professor, CalPoly Pomona
Registration: $70 Attending the Conference / $90 Not Attending the Conference

Outplanting is a tool commonly used in the practice of native restoration and also to sustain plant populations at risk of extinction; however, outplanting programs for many plant species have had limited success. Unpredictable annual precipitation patterns, competition with invasive plant species, predation by non-native species, and poor habitat quality all contribute to low survival rates. In particular, desiccation and water stress are significant barriers to plant survival in most reintroduction and restoration outplanting programs. A topographic habitat suitability model (HSM) is a tool to enhance landscape planning for outplanting. The HSM identifies topographic depressions that are protected from prevailing winds (high suitability sites) and contrasts them with ridges and other exposed areas (low suitability sites). In this workshop a new toolbox for ArcMap will be introduced that can be used to create a HSM for any landscape. The goal of the workshop is to provide attendees with experience using the tool and to discuss its application in restoration and resource management decisions.

GIS professionals, professionals with outplanting programs for native and at-risk species, and undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to attend. Some prior GIS experience is helpful in getting the most from the workshop.

Participants will receive a copy of the Habitat Suitability Mapping Toolbox for ArcMap, a written guide for using the toolbox, and a sample digital elevation dataset to use during the workshop; participants are encouraged to bring digital elevation data for their own sites to the workshop in order to make a habitat suitability map for their site of interest.

Please bring a laptop with ArcMap software installed if possible – we will have some extras for those who are not able to bring their own. Participants are encouraged to bring digital elevation data for their own sites to the workshop in order to make a habitat suitability map for their site of interest.

Erin Questad studies restoration ecology, landscape-level ecosystem management, remote sensing applications in ecology and conservation, and ecosystem restoration on military lands. Over the last six years, she and her collaborators have developed a landscape modelling tool to aid in outplanting programs for native plant restoration and reintroduction programs.

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Vegetation in Conservation Planning and Environmental Review
Wednesday, January 31, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Instructors: Todd Keeler-Wolf, Senior Vegetation Ecologist, California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW); Julie Evens, Vegetation Program Director, California Native Plant Society (CNPS); Diana Hickson, Senior Biogeographer, CDFW; Jennifer Buck-Diaz, Vegetation Ecologist, CNPS; Greg Suba, Conservation Program Director, CNPS
Registration fees: $115 Attending the Conference / $145 Not Attending the Conference

This workshop will focus on the use of A Manual of California Vegetation (MCV) classification and Survey of California Vegetation mapping for environmental impact assessment and conservation planning. Major topics include how vegetation, especially rare vegetation communities, should be addressed in the CEQA process, how to use the information in the online MCV and other web sources, and the proper flow and integration of vegetation information into local and regional planning processes.

This workshop is designed for environmental consultants, lead agencies, and EIR reviewers. Participants should have basic knowledge of CEQA and ecology.

Dr. Todd Keeler-Wolf is the Senior Vegetation Ecologist with the CDFW Vegetation Classification and Mapping Program (VegCAMP). He is co-author with John Sawyer and Julie Evens of the Second Edition of A Manual of California Vegetation. Todd received all his degrees at UC Santa Cruz.

Julie Evens has been the CNPS Vegetation Program Director since 2002 and is co-author of the 2nd edition of A Manual of California Vegetation and California’s Botanical Landscapes, along with many other vegetation reports.

Diana Hickson is the Senior Biogeographer with the CDFW Vegetation Classification and Mapping Program. Her work regularly includes integrating vegetation concepts into conservation and long term management of state lands.

Jennifer Buck-Diaz is a Vegetation Ecologist with the CNPS Vegetation Program. She is an expert in identifying rare vegetation as elements of conservation.

Greg Suba is the Conservation Program Director for CNPS. He has advocated for vegetation conservation and incorporated vegetation in numerous regional conservation plans around the state.

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